TTT | Books to Read Again for the First Time

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly topic hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week she provide a topic and you are free to use that topic and/or variations of that topic to make your top ten list. A full list of the weekly themes can be found here.

Reading a book for the first time is so special and hits you differently then when you re-read something. So, here are the books I’d love to read again for the first time.

This book will never not break my heart! I wish I could read it again and just absorb every line and action into my being.

Dig is a non-linear story that digs (pun not intended) into a family that used to be potato farmers. It’s about how do we reconcile our past with our future and what is the responsibility of white people in America. Just a beautiful novel with lots of questions to discuss.

I just want to spend more time with this family, and see what happens in the future for them.

In our age of Covid, reading about the AIDS crisis seems fitting. A crisis that no one wanted and one that people didn’t seem to care much about. I’d love to read June’s journey for the first time and her relationship with her uncle, the only person who seems to understand June. To be able to go on the journey of grief with her again and just fully immerse myself in her story.

I first read this in a graduate poetry class, so it was speed read through to finish it in time for class. To get the chance to read it again for the first time and really soak up the poems that Eavan Boland writes would be such a pleasure.

While I love a good mystery/horror book, I sometimes feel like I never really enjoy the story enough cause I’m just wanting to know whodunit or what’s going on. I’m so focused on getting to the end that I miss really getting to know the journey and characters.

Again another mystery book that I rushed through to see what happened. I’d especially love to read this again cause I’m always a sucker for anything Holmes & Watson related.

Another book that raises so many questions about family and what we pass down to the next generation.

I absolutely love retellings, especially if the retelling changes things up like making Jane Eyre a killer. Yes, please! I’d absolutely love to get to read this again for the first time just for the funness of the novel.

I think about this book about once a week, if not more. It ruined me! I’d love to be able to read Verity and Mattie’s friendship anew and get to experience all the many emotions that come with it.

Happy Reading Darlings!

#FridayFavorites | Short Stories

I started #FridayFavorites back when I started up the blog again and wanted to make sure I kept at least one regular post a week. This was, of course, before I knew there were others out there. But I decided to keep it, especially since I have the whole year planned out. If anyone wants to join me, the list for future topics can be found here.

Today’s topic is on some of my favorite short stories.

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

This one messed me up when I first read it; I think it was around late middle school. I love Shirley Jackson but in this one, the way she conveys the fear and horror of the story in only a few short pages is magnificent.

The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe

Such a classic tale, and also one I read in middle school. The way guilt eats at us and how it causes us to react is so fascinating.

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Okay, finally one that I didn’t read until….high school…maybe college. I’m totally blanking now on when I first read it. Either way, one of the first blatant feminist texts I read. Ah, the patriarchy!

A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery O’Connor

Flannery O’Connor’s titles do not mean what you think they’re going to mean. I did not know this when I first read O’Connor, so I was not expecting the ending to this one either.

Good Country People by Flannery O’Connor

As O’Connor did with “A Good Man is Hard to Find” she does with “Good Country People” by using irony and finely controlled comic sense to reveal the world as it is – with no vision or knowledge. She uses both her stories to show how misconceptions, prejudices, and stereotypes ultimately harm those around us.

By complete accident, all of these do fall into a Halloween theme.

Happy Reading, Lovelies!

TTT | Books that Make Me Hungry

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly topic hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week she provide a topic and you are free to use that topic and/or variations of that topic to make your top ten list. A full list of the weekly themes can be found here.

The topic for today is over books that make me hungry. If you don’t know me that well, then you’ll need to know that if I see a commercial, I’m then wanting that food. It’s the reason I don’t have cable. With all this in mind, I’m not a person who reads book about or on food. I also don’t own any cookbooks because I hate cooking. Instead, I decided to find some of my favorite quotes about food from books (yes, there are only 7; I gave up).

“If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.” The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

“We eat the year away. We eat the spring and the summer and the fall. We wait for something to grow and then we eat it.” We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

“Though their life was modest, they believed in eating well.” Dubliners by James Joyce

“And when they had finished the fish, Mrs Beaver brought unexpectedly out of the oven a great and gloriously sticky marmalade roll, steaming hot, and at the same time moved the kettle onto the fire, so that when they had finished the marmalade roll the tea was made and ready to be poured out.” The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

“Eatable marshmallow pillows. Lickable wallpaper for nurseries. Hot ice creams for cold days. Cows that give chocolate milk. Fizzy lifting drinks. Square sweets that look round.” Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

“Our grapes fresh from the vine,

Pomegranates full and fine,

Dates and sharp bullaces,

Rare pears and greengages,

Damsons and bilberries,

Taste them and try:

Currants and gooseberries,

Bright-fire-like barberries,

Figs to fill your mouth,

Citrons from the South,

Sweet to tongue and sound to eye,

Come buy, come buy.”
Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti

“Harry’s mouth fell open. The dishes in front of him were now piled with food. He had never seen so many things he liked to eat on one table: roast beef, roast chicken, pork chops and lamb chops, sausages, bacon and steak, boiled potatoes, roast potatoes, fries, Yorkshire pudding, peas, carrots, gravy, ketchup, and, for some strange reason, peppermint humbugs.”
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

#FridayFavorites | Books Published in the 20th Century (American)

I started #FridayFavorites back when I started up the blog again and wanted to make sure I kept at least one regular post a week. This was, of course, before I knew there were others out there. But I decided to keep it, especially since I have the whole year planned out.

Today’s topic covers my top five favorite books published in the 20th century (in America). This may be cheating a bit, but I’m of the opinion that trying to find one favorite book is too difficult. What genre? Time period? Area? You get the idea, hence the reason to separate Britain from America.

In order of publication:

Words cannot describe this book. Zora Neale Hurston is one of the greatest writers in my less than humble opinion. Just go read it!

1937

Oh. My. Word. This book….words cannot describe how amazing and subtly creepy it was. Shirley Jackson is a powerhouse of a writer!!

1959

I think this book just tells such a moving story of how tragic life can end and how senseless it can be. This quote from Perry Smith really sums it up: “They never hurt me. Like other people. Like people have all my life. Maybe it’s just the Clutters were the ones that had to pay for it.” Also, it did start my true crime obsession, so.

1959

I love, love, love Kurt Vonnegut! This was actually my first Vonnegut novel, and I fell completely in love with the book and his writings. Still haven’t completed his canon cause there’s just too many great books to read.

1969

Yes…I’m including A Game of Thrones cause it is a high-fantasy masterpiece! The first book is just amazing…okay, you have to get through around the first hundred pages, but then it’s amazing, promise!

Happy Reading, Lovelies!