TTT | Memorable Things Characters Have Said

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly topic hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week she provide a topic and you are free to use that topic and/or variations of that topic to make your top ten list. A full list of the weekly themes can be found here.

Well this past weekend has been pretty heavy for myself and my family, but we’re all trying our best and moving forward. Today’s Top Ten Tuesday is focused on memorable quotes characters have said.

Eventually, when those massive stars reach the end of their lives, they go out with a bang, a supernova so bright, so beautiful it drowns out all the other stars. And when they do, they throw out all those elements they created. That’s what we’re made of. We’ve got calcium in our bones and iron in our blood and nitrogen in our DNA . . . and all of that? It comes from those stars. We are literally made of stardust.

Written in the Stars by Alexandria Bellefleur

Kiss me, Hardy! Kiss me, quick!

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

The lives that ended that night mattered. It was a mistake for this city to try to forget, and it’s an even bigger one to pretend everything’s fine now. Black men and women are dying today for the same reasons they did in 1921. And we have to call that out, Rowan. Every single time.

Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham

I cannot conceive of a universe without you in it

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

I cannot make speeches, Emma…If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am. You hear nothing but truth from me. I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have borne it as no other woman in England would have borne it.

Emma by Jane Austen

You wonder why I’m so uptight about entitle white culture? It’s not just that I live here half the time and see real poverty. It’s not just the snack baskets in first class. It’s because entitled white culture encourages those inside it to never look outside their own fucking worlds. We blow everything off because we’re so concerned with looking good we can’t just feel.

Dig by A.S. King

If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway. It’s easy to tell when a question is coming from a good place. Then listen some more. Sometimes people just want to feel heard. Here’s to possibilities of friendship and connection and understanding.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

If you want to know what a man is like take a good look at how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by Some Woman

Oh, justice exists, maybe not the kind that happens in police stations and courtrooms, but it does exist. And when you really think about it, those words – good and bad, right and wrong – they don’t really matter in the real world. Who gets to decide what they mean: those people who just got it wrong and let Max walk free? No, I think we all get to decide what good and bad and right and wrong mean to us, not what we’re told to accept. You did nothing wrong. Don’t beat yourself up for other people’s mistakes.

Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson

Happy Reading Darlings!

TTT | Books to Read Again for the First Time

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly topic hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week she provide a topic and you are free to use that topic and/or variations of that topic to make your top ten list. A full list of the weekly themes can be found here.

Reading a book for the first time is so special and hits you differently then when you re-read something. So, here are the books I’d love to read again for the first time.

This book will never not break my heart! I wish I could read it again and just absorb every line and action into my being.

Dig is a non-linear story that digs (pun not intended) into a family that used to be potato farmers. It’s about how do we reconcile our past with our future and what is the responsibility of white people in America. Just a beautiful novel with lots of questions to discuss.

I just want to spend more time with this family, and see what happens in the future for them.

In our age of Covid, reading about the AIDS crisis seems fitting. A crisis that no one wanted and one that people didn’t seem to care much about. I’d love to read June’s journey for the first time and her relationship with her uncle, the only person who seems to understand June. To be able to go on the journey of grief with her again and just fully immerse myself in her story.

I first read this in a graduate poetry class, so it was speed read through to finish it in time for class. To get the chance to read it again for the first time and really soak up the poems that Eavan Boland writes would be such a pleasure.

While I love a good mystery/horror book, I sometimes feel like I never really enjoy the story enough cause I’m just wanting to know whodunit or what’s going on. I’m so focused on getting to the end that I miss really getting to know the journey and characters.

Again another mystery book that I rushed through to see what happened. I’d especially love to read this again cause I’m always a sucker for anything Holmes & Watson related.

Another book that raises so many questions about family and what we pass down to the next generation.

I absolutely love retellings, especially if the retelling changes things up like making Jane Eyre a killer. Yes, please! I’d absolutely love to get to read this again for the first time just for the funness of the novel.

I think about this book about once a week, if not more. It ruined me! I’d love to be able to read Verity and Mattie’s friendship anew and get to experience all the many emotions that come with it.

Happy Reading Darlings!

#FridayFives | World War II Fiction

I started #FridayFavorites back when I started up the blog again and wanted to make sure I kept at least one regular post a week. This was, of course, before I knew there were others out there. But I decided to keep it, especially since I have the whole year planned out. In December, I decided to change it to #FridayFives instead to have more room for topics. If anyone wants to join me, the list for future topics can be found here.

I read quite a bit of World War II fiction, so here are some of my favorites. Let me know which WWII books you enjoy in the comments.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Alice Network by Kate Quinn

Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows

Happy Reading Darlings!

#FridayFives | Books I Recommend

I started #FridayFavorites back when I started up the blog again and wanted to make sure I kept at least one regular post a week. This was, of course, before I knew there were others out there. But I decided to keep it, especially since I have the whole year planned out. In December, I decided to change it to #FridayFives instead to have more room for topics. If anyone wants to join me, the list for future topics can be found here.

One of my favorite parts of reading, besides the actual reading, is to talk about books with others. But I can’t do that if the person hasn’t read the book. So, here are the top books I’d recommend. For anyone who has read them, drop a comment about your favorite part or why you liked it so much.

Just go ahead, drop everything you’re doing, find the nearest bookstore, and buy this book! You will not regret it. Code Name Verity is a wonderful book about friendship during a time of war, but it’s also such a mystery as well, and it’s just so beautiful and heartbreaking.

“It’s like being in love, discovering your best friend.”

Goodreads

Gosh! What can I say that the review at the bottom doesn’t cover. “Lesbian necromancers explore a haunted gothic palace in space!” I mean what more do you need in life?!

“Maybe it’s that I find the idea comforting…that thousands of years after you’re gone…is when you really live. That your echo is louder than your voice is.”

Goodreads

The creativity to have the narrator be Death was truly what drew me in. I truly appreciated that death wasn’t cruel or mean, but that he was just tired. Tired of working for tyrants and dictators.

“I wanted to tell the book thief many things, about beauty and brutality. But what could I tell her about those things that she didn’t already know?”

Goodreads

I forgot how well written and how much fun this book and series is! I’m definitely enjoying going back down memory lane with this series, plus I cannot wait to get my hands on the other Riordan has.

“It’s funny how humans can wrap their mind around things and fit them into their version of reality.”

Goodreads

To be perfectly honest, this book definitely raised my anxiety levels. It was heartbreaking and nerve-wracking to see what can happen if we don’t stop hurting the earth and mother nature. Definitely one that will stay with you and make you think!

“That in our self-importance, in our search for meaning, we have forgotten how to share the planet that gave us life.”

Goodreads

Happy Reading Darlings!

#FridayFives | Books that I have Strong Emotions About

I started #FridayFavorites back when I started up the blog again and wanted to make sure I kept at least one regular post a week. This was, of course, before I knew there were others out there. But I decided to keep it, especially since I have the whole year planned out. In December, I decided to change it to #FridayFives instead to have more room for topics. If anyone wants to join me, the list for future topics can be found here.

Books give us strong emotions, sometimes negative and sometimes positive. For this post, I’m going to list the five books that give me strong positive emotions. And by positive or negative, I mean whether I liked the book or not.

Not only was this emotional for Franny’s storyline, but also for the environmental catastrophe’s that are being faced in the story. It brings out so many emotions knowing that we are heading that way if we don’t change.

Goodreads

My Review

I will always, always, always recommend this book to everyone! I just have to remember the line “Kiss me, Hardy! Kiss me, quick!” and I am in tears. This is such a beautiful book about war and friendships.

Goodreads

I cannot explain the beauty of this book. It was such a difficult read at points but so important to understand what goes on in different cultures and different places.

Goodreads

So many emotions, especially in regards to the fact that so many LGBTQ+ young adults are forced out of there houses for being themselves. I cannot understand parents who do that, nor will I ever. This book is so beautiful and heartbreaking but hopeful!

Goodreads

I loved the Avatar: the Last Airbender growing up and have just finished rewatching it (and watching The Legend of Korra for the first time)! I was fascinated with Kyoshi, Kyoshi Island, and the Kyoshi Warriors. I just finished this book last week and was given all the feels, especially in regards to Kyoshi and Rangi’s love story!

Goodreads

Happy Reading Lovelies!

TTT | Questions I Would Ask My Favorite Authors

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly topic hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week she provide a topic and you are free to use that topic and/or variations of that topic to make your top ten list. A full list of the weekly themes can be found here.

The theme for today is questions I’d ask my favorite authors. These are not in any order except the order of whichever questions came to my mind first. Without further ado:

Toni Morrison-Why did your publisher want you to change the title of Paradise from War? Was it something you agreed or disagreed with?

Elizabeth Wein-What inspired you to write Code Name Verity? What part came to you first the plot of the book or the friendship between Verity and Maddie?

Sarah J. Maas-What parts were the most difficult to write in the Throne of Glass series?

Jane Austen-Many people today take what your nephew, James, wrote about Emma as truth. Was Emma written with the intention to create a heroine whom no one but yourself will much like? If it isn’t true, which of your characters is your favorite and why?

Laurie Frankel- As you were writing This Is How It Always Is, was there any specific hopes you had for audience members when they read it? Were you wanting to understand, change their minds on transgender children, etc.?

Shakespeare-What would you say to the fact that most people take your quotes out of context, not realizing they are dick jokes or making fun of people who cannot make a decision?

Anne Blankman-What was the inspiration for Prisoner of Night and Fog? What were you wanting to convey by having the story told through someone who adored her “Uncle Dolf?”

Kerri Maniscalco-What aspects of the Jack the Ripper killings most fascinated you to write the book Stalking Jack the Ripper? Did you know from the beginning who the killer was going to be, or did that change as you were writing?

Robin Talley-In Lies We Tell Ourselves, you focus on 2 difficult and controversial social issues: LGBTQ and desegregation. Did you begin writing with only one of those issues in mind or both? What was the decision to write on both desegregation and two girls falling in love?

J.K. Rowling-Why? Just why? Why do you keep digging a whole? Why do you keep only bringing up topics you know nothing about? Whhhyyy??

Let me know about the questions you’d like to ask your favorite author(s) below!

Happy Reading, Lovelies!

TTT | Authors I’ve Read the Most Books By

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly topic hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week she provide a topic and you are free to use that topic and/or variations of that topic to make your top ten list. A full list of the weekly themes can be found here.

Here are the authors I’ve read the most:

  1. Elizabeth Wein (3 books) – I absolutely love all of her books. She tackles so many important topics from history that should be talked about. Wein takes pieces from history and uses the perspective of a teenager to tell the story. I’ve read 3 of her books – Code Name Verity, Rose Under Fire, and A Thousand Sisters. I recommend Code Name Verity to everyone I meet!
  2. Ruta Sepetys (3 books) – Another author does tackle important topics like Wein does. She also takes events from history and uses a fictional teenager perspective to tell the story. The Fountains of Silence has been on my TBR since it’s been out.
  3. Stephanie Perkins (4 books) – She’s one of the go-to feel good authors I absolutely love! Her Anna and the French Kiss “series” (companion series) are adorable and lovely.
  4. Rick Riordan (5 books) – I’ve been obsessed with Greek Mythology since I was in elementary school, so when these came out, I devoured the Percy Jackson series. I haven’t read his others, but I’ve been wanting to.
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien (6 books) – I’m sad to say I didn’t grow up reading The Lord of the Rings. I didn’t get to them til I was in college and fell in love with the world that Tolkien created.
  6. J.K. Rowling (7 books) – I’m not even going to say anything about her cause of what has happened. I’ve only ever read Harry Potter and am donating/selling the other books of hers I have.
  7. Lauren Oliver (7 books) – Her books are always so fascinating and leave me wanting more. I always have more questions than answers.
  8. Sarah J. Maas (8 books) – Celaena Sardothien is my favorite character in the world! I fell in love with her in Throne of Glass and continue to love her as well as the other cast of characters in this series. Maas’s A Court of Thorns and Roses series is just as amazing. The first books are always great and somehow they get better and better as you go further in the series.
  9. Cassandra Clare (11 books)- I definitely enjoyed The Mortal Instruments series, but the Infernal Devices is where Clare hits her stride and becomes such a better writer. With her Dark Artifices series, or at least the first 2, blew my mind, especially how she incorporated Edgar Allan Poe and his “Annabel Lee” poem. I do need to re-read the first two of the Dark Artifices, and then read Chain of Gold!
  10. Toni Morrison (12 books) – one of the greatest writers in the world. Hands down! I’ll fight people on this one. She’s amazing and tackles so many important topics surrounding African Americans, slavery, the Black experience in America. I cannot say enough good things about her. I wouldn’t read them all in one semester like I had to do for a grad class.

Let me know your most read authors below! Happy Reading, Lovelies!