TTT | Freebie

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly topic hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week she provide a topic and you are free to use that topic and/or variations of that topic to make your top ten list. A full list of the weekly themes can be found here.

As most book people are aware of The Storygraph, I’m going to take this Top Ten Tuesday to discuss books that were recommended to me through the Plus feature (this is in no way sponsored by The Storygraph). The books on the left side are the ones I’ve read, and the books on the right are the ones suggested by the Storygraph Plus feature for the book on the left.

Happy Reading Darlings!

#FridayFive | Books that Deal with Tough but Important Issues

I started #FridayFavorites back when I started up the blog again and wanted to make sure I kept at least one regular post a week. This was, of course, before I knew there were others out there. But I decided to keep it, especially since I have the whole year planned out. In December, I decided to change it to #FridayFives instead to have more room for topics. If anyone wants to join me, the list for future topics can be found here.

Today’s topic are books that have difficult topics but ones that are important topics, and we should definitely read them!

A dual narrative that questions how far we’ve come with race relations in America.

Issues: Race relations and equality


A young girl goes back to her parents’ country not knowing that they have plans for her future, an arranged and forced marriage.

Issues: Forced marriages


A powerful coming-of-age story about grief, guilt, and the risks a Filipino-American teenager takes to uncover the truth about his cousin’s murder.

Issues: drugs, Duterte’s archaic war on drugs, grief, family relations


Sadie runs away from home on a journey of revenge after her sister, Mattie, is brutally murdered.

Issues: sexual assault/rape, pedophilia, child abuse


A novel about revelations, transformations, fairy tales, and family. And it’s about the ways this is how it always is: Change is always hard and miraculous and hard again, parenting is always a leap into the unknown with crossed fingers and full hearts, children grow but not always according to plan. And families with secrets don’t get to keep them forever.

Issues: family relations, LGBTQIA+, transgender child

Happy Reading Darlings!

TTT | Books I Read In One Sitting

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly topic hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week she provide a topic and you are free to use that topic and/or variations of that topic to make your top ten list. A full list of the weekly themes can be found here.

There are some books that just drag you in and won’t let you leave until you finish them. Here are those books for me!

Yes, I’m one of those white people who didn’t learn about the Tulsa Race Riot until watching the first episode of HBO’s Watchmen. But since then I have been finding books, both fiction and nonfiction, to learn more about this event.

Dreamland Burning is such a beautifully written book about such a horrible time period in America’s history. Going back and forth between Rowan Chase, a 17 year old girl living in modern-day Tulsa, and Will Tillman, a 17 year old boy living in 1920 Tulsa, as they try to uncover what happened that night and how it affects all of us today.

Rowan Caine stumbles across an ad for a nanny position. She’s not looking for a new job, but she ends up taking it. But once she arrives for the job, the kids who seemed angelic at the interview are anything but, the house’s electrical systems keeps going on the fritz, and she keeps feeling isolated in this remote house. Yet, the whole book is Rowan’s confession to what happened because a child is dead and she’s the one in jail for it. Mystery books are one of those were I have to finish even if I figure out what’s going to happen. I either have to know I’m right or need to figure out who the killer is.

If you want my thoughts on this book then check out my review for it here.

I don’t think I’ll ever be over this book, it was that good! I read it in one day over the Christmas holidays. A book that has a mystery, lesbian necromancers, and a haunted gothic palace in space, sign me up!

I haven’t posted my review for this yet, but oh man, do I need to the next book in this duology! A retelling of sleeping beauty that has lesbians and a more developed magic system. In Briar, there are Graces, those granted with powers from the faeire kingdom, they’re able to give out spells and enchantments to those who can afford them. Alyce is the Dark Grace, someone born with dark magic in their veins. But Aurora and Alyce meet and soon become friends, then more.

Just like the four Hawthorne grandsons, I was pulled into the mystery of Avery Grambs. Who was she? Why did Tobias leave his entire fortune to her? What was up with this house? What really happened to Tobias Hawthorne’s son? So many questions and I need the next book in the series, NOW!

Also, is there a way I can explore this house? Pretty please?

Here is my review for the book.

I’m still shocked by how much I loved Hank Green’s book, especially considering that the only book by John Green I’ve actually finished is The Fault in Our Stars (I totally just blanked on the name of that book while writing this). While I enjoy the Green brothers YouTube videos, I’ve never been a fan of John Green’s books. I thought I’d read Hank’s and it would be the same. Yet, it wasn’t!

The storyline totally pulled me in, as well as the philosophical questions of fame and money and how much it goes to our head. Along with that, the questions on progress and technology, of those who are different from us. I have yet to get the second book because I’m wanting to re-read this one first (and I haven’t had the time to do that).

I legitimately stayed up until around 2 am to finish this book. That was back when I didn’t have as much of a problem with Sarah J. Maas, since then I haven’t really enjoyed her books as much. I’m also completely tired of the whole “mates” idea.

I could do a whole post on why I’ve changed my views on Sarah J. Maas, but a post by Between the Pages sums up basically all the same views that I have.

Anyway, I’m not saying her books are bad, nor am I saying she’s a bad person, but they’re just not my cup of tea anymore. If you like her books and they bring you joy, great! I’m so happy you’ve found a book/author you love! (This is not me being sarcastic, for those who know me, it may come off that way, and I apologize if it does. I’m being serious here).

I love Pip and Ravi so, so, so much!! Holly Jackson had such great characters, plot, pacing in this book that it kind of set a new standard for me on YA murder/crime fiction. I have a copy of the second book, Good Girl, Bad Blood, but I haven’t read it because I’m not ready to let go of Pip and Ravi!

This book was definitely difficult to read at times, due to the topic of forced marriages in the book, but I read it one sitting because I NEEDED to know what was going to happen to Naila.

After Naila is busted by her parents for going to prom with her boyfriend, they all go on a family trip to Pakistan to visit with family. Unbeknownst to Naila, her parents are arranging a marriage for her while she’s there. Definitely a book that needs to be read and a topic that should be talked about more.

Not going to lie, I was hesitant to read this since it was published by James Patterson. I’m so glad I did give it a chance because oh was it such an interesting twist on Jack the Ripper.

Audrey is born a lord’s daughter and has wealth and privilege set before her. Yet, she wants to cut up dead bodies. What girl doesn’t? But soon, Audrey is dragged into an investigation of a serial killer and her search for answers may bring her back to her own home. Again, a good murder mystery always keeps me up reading.

Happy Reading Darlings!

TTT | Books I Loved that Made Me Want More Books Like Them

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly topic hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week she provide a topic and you are free to use that topic and/or variations of that topic to make your top ten list. A full list of the weekly themes can be found here.

Today’s topic covers books that made me want to read more books like this. This could be books in that genre, time period, place, etc.

I recently finished this book where half of it was set during the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot. This definitely made me want to read more books on the Tulsa Riot of 1921 and to learn more about what happened since my schooling failed to tell me about this!

Not that this is my first gothic novel, but it definitely made me want to read even more gothic novels and gothic novels that were not always set in England.

I just wanted to read all the novels set in New Orleans! I still do actually. And it doesn’t matter the time period.

Kate Moore’s storytelling of a real life event was so compelling that I want to read more nonfiction.

I became obsessed with WWII novels after reading The Book Thief, and I haven’t stopped reading WWII novels since.

Retellings of classic novels, fairytales, anything has become a favorite genre of mine since reading Jane Steele.

First read The Secret Scripture in undergrad and wanted to read all books set in Ireland and any books about Ireland. It became such an obsession that I focused on Irish Literature in my English Master’s degree.

I’m not a fan of romance focused books but I absolutely fell in love with them after Boyfriend Material. I realized I just don’t like hetero romance stories, so any LGBTQ+ romance, I’m all here for.

YA murder mysteries are always so fun because they have pretty good storylines with not as much at stake (and not as much gore).

HP was my introduction into fantasy and made me fall in love and want to read more. I was 7 at the time, so I don’t really remember if I read any other fantasy books before this one.

Happy Reading, Darlings!