Friday Fives | Children’s Holiday Books

As per usual, I started Friday Fives back when I started up the blog again and wanted to make sure I kept at least one regular post a week. This was, of course, before I knew there were others out there. But I decided to keep it, especially since I have the whole year planned out. In December, I decided to change it to Friday Fives instead to have more room for topics. If anyone wants to join me, the list for future topics can be found here.

When each family at the diverse Juniper Court apartment complex needs something to light up the dark of winter, the stumpy, lumpy candle provides a glow brighter than the fanciest taper, revealing the true spirit of each holiday it illuminates.


Gita’s family has only recently emigrated from India. Although she misses her relatives and friends, she has already made some friends in her new home. Today, she is looking forward to her favourite holiday – Divali, a festival of lights with fireworks, laughter and exchanges of sweets. But Gita’s plans soon fall apart and she becomes homesick and sad.


As the sun set on the shortest day of the year, early people would gather to prepare for the long night ahead. They built fires and lit candles. They played music, bringing their own light to the darkness, while wondering if the sun would ever rise again. “The Shortest Day” captures the magic behind the returning of the light, the yearning for traditions that connect us with generations that have gone before — and the hope for peace that we carry into the future.


Kwanzaa is Kayla’s favorite time of year. But this year, it looks as if a heavy snowstorm will keep her big brother, Khari, from getting home in time for the festivities Will Khari miss the celebration completely? Or will Kayla and her brother somehow find a way to be together for Kwanzaa?


A look at modern Native American life as told by a citizen of the Cherokee Nation

The word otsaliheliga (oh-jah-LEE-hay-lee-gah) is used by members of the Cherokee Nation to express gratitude. Beginning in the fall with the new year and ending in summer, follow a full Cherokee year of celebrations and experiences.

Happy Reading Darlings!

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